Last updated on June 11th, 2018 at 04:02 pm

Chickenpox (varicella)

Schedule: CDC recommends two doses of chickenpox vaccine for children, adolescents, and adults. Children should receive two doses of the vaccine—the first dose at 12 through 15 months old and a second dose at 4 through 6 years old.

Chickenpox is a very contagious disease caused by the varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It causes a blister-like rash, itching, tiredness, and fever. Chickenpox used to be very common in the United States. Each year, chickenpox caused about 4 million cases, about 10,600 hospitalizations and 100 to 150 deaths.

Two doses of the vaccine are about 90% effective at preventing chickenpox. When you get vaccinated, you protect yourself and others in your community. This is especially important for people who cannot get vaccinated, such as those with weakened immune systems or pregnant women.

Some people who are vaccinated against chickenpox may still get the disease. However, it is usually milder with fewer blisters and little or no fever. Talk with your healthcare professional if you have questions about chickenpox vaccine.

Websites:

CDC Chickenpox disease website offers accurate information and resources for all.

             Chickenpox fact sheet and game for kids

             Information for healthcare professionals

Vaccines.gov offers resources from federal agencies for the general public and their communities about vaccines across the lifespan.

Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia answers questions about the Chickenpox Vaccine.

Immunization Action Coalition offers free information and downloads for healthcare providers, parents and coalitions.

 

Chickenpox Personal Testimonial

How we conquered the deadly smallpox virus - Simona Zompi

2014 Pennsylvania Immunization Coalition
204 St. Charles Way, Unit 303E York, Pennsylvania 17402
PH: 484-446-3040 FX: 484-446-3255 Email: Info@immunizepa.org

The PAIC web site provides immunization information for your general knowledge and is in no way intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding immunizations.

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